With the legalization of marijuana across many states in the USA, and even total legalization throughout Canada, more and more people are setting their sights on hemp and how to best take advantage of the plant.

Since marijuana has been persona non-grata for such a long time, people tend to be woefully uneducated about what exactly hemp is, and how it differs from recreational marijuana, as well as what it can be used for. Because of this, there are a lot of questions about hemp that are begging to be answered in full. With more and more industrial producers of hemp, including Industrial Hemp Farms, it's prudent that misconceptions about hemp be cleared up, so the plant can enjoy the same level of acceptance that similar industrial materials have enjoyed.

What is the difference between hemp and marijuana?

The most significant and most important distinction is that hemp and marijuana aren't the same thing. While derived from the same plant, they are different products entirely. Marijuana comes from the female plant, and is grown for its buds that when smoked, produces a euphoric intoxication from the chemical THC. Hemp, however, is grown to be as bushy and stalky as possible with little regard for any buds or leaves. Industrial hemp is typically categorized by having less than 0.3% by weight in the leaves and flower.

In essence, marijuana is harvested for a high THC content in the flowering buds, while hemp is grown for its raw plant material to be processed into hemp fibers, with as minimal THC content as possible.

What's hemp used for?

Since hemp isn't going to be used for smoking, why are people interested in growing it? Well, hemp has a myriad of uses. First off, hemp fibers can be made into warm and durable clothing. Secondly, fibers from hemp can also be used to make a more environmentally renewable source of paper and other textiles. The seeds from the hemp plant are also extremely high in protein and omega-3, which has garnered the interest of the healthy food market. Other more niche uses for hemp include building supplies, biofuels, and cosmetics.

Is hemp easy to grow?

Compared to long-term plants like trees and other plants typically used in the textile industry, hemp is extremely easy to grow regardless of climate, and does so relatively quickly. It's a very resilient crop with only minimal pesticides required to have the plants grow prosperously.

Can hemp get you stoned?

Since hemp is grown with the intention of having as little THC content as possible, it's an inferior choice as a recreational drug. There won't be much, if any, intoxication to speak of from consuming it. At levels of 0.3% THC and lower, it would take significant (read: near impossible) amounts of hemp to become even slightly intoxicating.

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article has helped to clear up some of the more pressing questions surrounding this wonderful plant. Many people are now looking into the hemp plant for their needs, now that the stigma around it is currently eroding quickly. People are beginning to understand the difference between recreational marijuana and industrial hemp. While both are from the cannabis family, they're hardly the same.